Презентация на тему: Merchandising Operations Horngren’s Accounting Lecture Twelve Lisa, Li 1

Реклама. Продолжение ниже
Merchandising Operations Horngren’s Accounting Lecture Twelve Lisa, Li 1
Merchandising Operations- Objective 1
Merchandising Operations Horngren’s Accounting Lecture Twelve Lisa, Li 1
Merchandising Operations Horngren’s Accounting Lecture Twelve Lisa, Li 1
Homework p306
Homework p306
Homework p342
Homework p342
Learning Objectives – Chapter 5
Learning Objectives – Chapter 5
Merchandising Operations Horngren’s Accounting Lecture Twelve Lisa, Li 1
4. Transportation Cost - Freight Out
5. Net Sales Revenue
5. Net Sales Revenue
6. Gross Profit
Practice Questions p312
Practice Question Solutions
Learning Objectives 4
Adjusting Merchandise Inventory
Adjusting Merchandise Inventory
Closing the Accounts of a Merchandiser
Closing in a Merchandiser
Closing the Accounts of a Merchandiser
Learning Objectives 5
Merchandiser’s Financial Statements
Single-Step Income Statement
Multi-Step Income Statement
Multi-Step Income Statement
Merchandising Operations Horngren’s Accounting Lecture Twelve Lisa, Li 1
Merchandising Operations Horngren’s Accounting Lecture Twelve Lisa, Li 1
Statement of Owner’s Equity and the B/S
Learning Objectives 6
Gross Profit Percentage
Gross Profit Percentage—Example
Gross Profit Percentage—Example
Gross Profit Percentage—Example
Gross Profit Percentage—Example
Practice Question
Practice Question
Example – Summary Problem 5-1
Merchandising Operations Horngren’s Accounting Lecture Twelve Lisa, Li 1
Summary Problem 5-1
Homework
Merchandising Operations Horngren’s Accounting Lecture Twelve Lisa, Li 1
1/44
Средняя оценка: 4.3/5 (всего оценок: 47)
Код скопирован в буфер обмена
Скачать (7177 Кб)
Реклама. Продолжение ниже
1

Первый слайд презентации

Merchandising Operations Horngren’s Accounting Lecture Twelve Lisa, Li 1

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
2

Слайд 2: Merchandising Operations- Objective 1

Accounting 2

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
3

Слайд 3

accounting Learning Objectives 2 Purchase of merchandise inventory using perpetual inventory system

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
4

Слайд 4

accounting Learning Objectives 3 Account for the sale of merchandise inventory using a perpetual inventory system

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
5

Слайд 5: Homework p306

accounting 5

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
6

Слайд 6: Homework p306

accounting 6

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/4
7

Слайд 7: Homework p342

accounting 7

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
Реклама. Продолжение ниже
8

Слайд 8: Homework p342

accounting 8 Date Accounts and Explanation Debit Credit Oct. 10 Merchandise Inventory (2,500 × $15) 37,500 Accounts Payable 37,500 Purchased inventory on account Oct. 13 Accounts Payable (100 × $15) 1,500 Merchandise Inventory 1,500 Returned inventory to seller Oct. 22 Accounts Payable ($37,500 − $1,500) 36,000 Cash ($36,000 – $720) 35,280 Merchandise Inventory ($36,000 × 0.02) 720 Paid within discount period net of return Date Accounts and Explanation Debit Credit Oct. 10 Accounts Receivable (2,500 × $15) 37,500 Sales Revenue 37,500 Sale on account Cost of Goods Sold 22,500 Merchandise Inventory 22,500 Record cost of goods sold Oct. 13 Sales Returns and Allowances (100 × $15) 1,500 Accounts Receivable 1,500 Received returned goods Merchandise Inventory 900 Cost of Goods Sold 900 Placed goods back in inventory Oct. 22 Cash ($36,000 − $720) 35,280 Sales Discounts ($36,000 × 0.02) 720 Accounts Receivable ($37,500 − $1,500) 36,000 Cash collection within discount period net of return Accounting book for The Textbook Store Accounting book for Piranha(seller)

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
9

Слайд 9: Learning Objectives – Chapter 5

Describe merchandising operations and the two types of merchandise inventory systems Account for the purchase of merchandise inventory using a perpetual inventory system Account for the sale of merchandise inventory using a perpetual inventory system Accounting 9

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
10

Слайд 10: Learning Objectives – Chapter 5

Adjust and close the accounts of a merchandising business Prepare a merchandiser’s financial statements Use the gross profit percentage to evaluate business performance Accounting 10

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
11

Слайд 11

accounting Learning Objectives 3 Account for the sale of merchandise inventory using a perpetual inventory system

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
12

Слайд 12: 4. Transportation Cost - Freight Out

The freight in is part of the inventory cost for the buyer. The freight out is a delivery expense to the seller. Smart Touch Learning pays $30 to ship the June 21 sale to the customer. 5- 12 accounting

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
13

Слайд 13: 5. Net Sales Revenue

For the year, Smart Touch Learning sells $297,500 of merchandise inventory. They process $11,200 of sales returns and allowances, and they award $5,600 of sales discounts. What is Net Sales Revenue for the year? 5- 13 accounting

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
14

Слайд 14: 5. Net Sales Revenue

For the year, Smart Touch Learning sells $297,500 of merchandise inventory. They process $11,200 of sales returns and allowances, and they award $5,600 of sales discounts. What is Net Sales Revenue for the year? 5- 14 accounting

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
Реклама. Продолжение ниже
15

Слайд 15: 6. Gross Profit

The difference between Net Sales Revenues and Cost of Goods Sold Indicates the amount available to cover operating expenses For this example, assume Smart Touch Learning’s Cost of Goods Sold is $199,500; its gross profit is calculated as follows: 5- 15 accounting

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
16

Слайд 16: Practice Questions p312

accounting 16

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
17

Слайд 17: Practice Question Solutions

accounting 17

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/4
18

Слайд 18: Learning Objectives 4

Adjust and close the accounts of a merchandising business Accounting 18

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
19

Слайд 19: Adjusting Merchandise Inventory

At the end of the period, actual inventory on hand may differ from the accounting records in perpetual inventory system. This difference can occur because of: Theft Damage Errors ‘Merchandise Inventory’ account must be adjusted at the end of the period accounting

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
20

Слайд 20: Adjusting Merchandise Inventory

Smart Touch Learning’s Merchandise Inventory account shows an unadjusted balance of $31,530,with no theft or error. But on December 31, ST Learning counts the inventory on hand, and the total cost comes to only $31,290. ST Learning records this adjusting entry for inventory shrinkage. And the entry brings Merchandise Inventory to its correct balance. accounting

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/4
21

Слайд 21: Closing the Accounts of a Merchandiser

Close R to Income Summary Close E and contra-revenues(-R) to Income Summary Close Income Summary to Capital Close Withdrawals to Capital 5- 21 accounting

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
22

Слайд 22: Closing in a Merchandiser

5- 22 accounting Closing in a Merchandiser

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/4
23

Слайд 23: Closing the Accounts of a Merchandiser

At this point, the Income Summary account has a $25,200 balance. Next, we need to close Income Summary to the Capital account. 5- 23 accounting

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
24

Слайд 24: Learning Objectives 5

Prepare a merchandiser’s financial statements Accounting 24

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
25

Слайд 25: Merchandiser’s Financial Statements

Income Statement Single-Step Income Statement Multi-Step Income Statement (common approach) Change in owner’s equity Balance Sheet The report format (A at top, L and O/E at bottom) The account format (A at left, L and O/E at right) Cash flow Statement 5- 25 accounting

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
26

Слайд 26: Single-Step Income Statement

Income statement format that groups all revenues together and then lists and deducts all expenses together without calculating any subtotals. accounting

Изображение слайда
1/1
27

Слайд 27: Multi-Step Income Statement

Multi-step I/S format that contains subtotals to highlight significant relationships. Net Sales Revenue Gross Profit (Gross Margin) Operating Income Net Income. 5- 27 accounting

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
28

Слайд 28: Multi-Step Income Statement

COGS: is also called Cost of Sales. It represents a functional expense. Gross profit: Net Sales Revenue minus COGS. It is the extra sale amount the company receives from the customer over what the company paid to the vendor. accounting

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
29

Слайд 29

Operating Expenses: Expenses (other than COGS) that occur in the entity’s major line of business. Operating income: Gross profit minus operating expenses. It measures the results of the entity’s major ongoing activities (normal operations). accounting Multi-Step Income Statement

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
30

Слайд 30

Other revenues and expenses: Revenues or expenses that are outside the normal, day-to-day operations of a business, such as interest expense, taxes, etc. Finally, Net Income is determined by subtracting Other Revenues and Expenses from Operating Income. accounting Multi-Step Income Statement

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2
31

Слайд 31: Statement of Owner’s Equity and the B/S

A merchandiser’s statement of owner’s equity looks exactly like that of a service business. Merchandisers have an additional CA, Merchandise Inventory. Service businesses do not have it in B/S. Accounting 31

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
32

Слайд 32: Learning Objectives 6

Use the gross profit percentage to evaluate business performance Accounting 32

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
33

Слайд 33: Gross Profit Percentage

Measures the profitability of each sales dollar. When this number is trending downward, it can indicate a significant problem. Useful profitability ratios

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
34

Слайд 34: Gross Profit Percentage—Example

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
35

Слайд 35: Gross Profit Percentage—Example

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
36

Слайд 36: Gross Profit Percentage—Example

a. $27,740 ($87,940 − $60,200) b. $3,524 ($103,600 − $99,200 − $876) c. $65,180 ($99,200 – $34,020)

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
37

Слайд 37: Gross Profit Percentage—Example

a. $27,740 ($87,940 − $60,200) b. $3,524 ($103,600 − $99,200 − $876) c. $65,180 ($99,200 – $34,020) d. $64,200 ($66,200 – $1,600 – $400) e. $23,700 ($64,200 – $40,500) f. $115,500 ($112,520 + $2,086 + $894) g. $112,520 ($75,800 + $36,720)

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
38

Слайд 38: Practice Question

accounting 38

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/4
39

Слайд 39: Practice Question

accounting 39 a. Sales – they should try to increase sales, a higher Sales will increase Gross Profit Percentage b. Sales Returns and Allowances – they should try to decrease sales returns and allowances, a higher Sales Returns and Allowances will decrease Gross Profit Percentage c. Cost of Goods Sold – they should try to decrease cost of goods sold, a higher Cost of Goods Sold will decrease Gross Profit Percentage d. Sales Discounts – they should try to decrease sales discounts, a higher Sales Discount will decrease Gross Profit Percentage

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
40

Слайд 40: Example – Summary Problem 5-1

Accounting 40

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/4
41

Слайд 41

Accounting 41

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/4
42

Слайд 42: Summary Problem 5-1

Accounting 42

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/3
43

Слайд 43: Homework

5- 43 The adjusted trial balance of Leading Business Systems at March 31, 2015, follows: Homework LEADING BUSINESS SYSTEMS Adjusted Trial Balance March 31, 2015 Balance Account Title Debit Credit Cash $3,000 Accounts Receivable 10,000 Merchandise Inventory 40,000 Office Supplies 7,500 Equipment 45,000 Accumulated Depreciation—Equipment $18,000 Accounts Payable 15,000 Salaries Payable 2,500 Notes Payable, long-term 11,100 Wright, Capital 50,000 Wright, Withdrawals 55,000 Sales Revenue 300,000 Sales Returns and Allowances 3,000 Sales Discounts 2,500 Cost of Goods Sold 180,000 Selling Expense 30,000 Administrative Expense 18,000 Interest Expense 2,600 Total $396,600 $396,600 Requirements 1. Journalize the required closing entries at March 31, 2015. 2. Set up T-accounts for Income Summary; Wright, Capital; and Wright, Withdrawals. Post the closing entries to the T-accounts and calculate their ending balances. 3. How much was Leading’s net income or net loss? 4. Prepare Leading’s multi-step income statement for the year ended March 31, 2015.

Изображение слайда
1/1
44

Последний слайд презентации: Merchandising Operations Horngren’s Accounting Lecture Twelve Lisa, Li 1

44 The End of Chapter 5

Изображение слайда
Изображение для работы со слайдом
1/2