Презентация на тему: Commas and Conjunctions

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Commas and Conjunctions
CONJUNCTIONS they bring objects together
A coordinating conjunction is a word that connects or joins words or groups of words to each other.
F ANBOYS: Breakin ’ it Down…
F A NBOYS: Breakin ’ it Down
F A N BOYS: Breakin ’ it Down
FAN B OYS: Breakin ’ it Down
FANB O YS: Breakin ’ it Down
FANBO Y S: Breakin ’ it Down
FANBOY S : Breakin ’ it Down
Commas enclosing words, phrases, and clauses since the beginning of time.
Commas and Conjunctions
Comma Crash Course
Rule 1: Commas separate parts of a series, words, phrases, and clauses
Rule 2: Commas separate two or more adjectives preceding a noun.
Rule 3: Use a comma before for, and, nor, but, or, yet and so to separate independent clauses in compound sentences.
Rule 4: Commas separate participial phrases and adjective clauses that are nonessential. Commas do not set off phrases or clauses that are essential to the
Rule 5: Commas follow participial phrases, adverb clauses, words such as well, yes, no, and names of direct address that begin sentences.
Rule 6: Use commas to enclose interrupters such as, most appositives and appositive phrases, titles and degrees after a name, words in direct address
Rule 7: Commas separate a quotation from its source, such as "he said" or "she said."
Rule 8: Commas are used in certain conventional situations such as, items in dates or addresses and after the salutation of a friendly letter and closing of
Comma/Conjunction Group Write
Group write guidelines
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Первый слайд презентации: Commas and Conjunctions

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Слайд 2: CONJUNCTIONS they bring objects together

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Слайд 3: A coordinating conjunction is a word that connects or joins words or groups of words to each other

For And Nor But Or Yet So A coordinating conjunction is a word that connects or joins words or groups of words to each other. The 7 Coordinating Conjunctions

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Слайд 4: F ANBOYS: Breakin ’ it Down…

The word FOR is most often used as a preposition, of course, but it does serve, on rare occasions, as a coordinating conjunction. It deals mostly with sequence or the order of things. I hate to waste a single drop of squid eyeball stew, for it is expensive and time-consuming to make. F ANBOYS: Breakin ’ it Down…

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Слайд 5: F A NBOYS: Breakin ’ it Down

When you want to join words or phrases, use the conjunction and. and = in addition to Ex. The bowl of squid eyeball stew is hot and delicious. F A NBOYS: Breakin ’ it Down

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Слайд 6: F A N BOYS: Breakin ’ it Down

The conjunction, nor, means not or neither. Ex. Rocky refuses to eat dry cat food, nor will he touch a saucer of squid eyeball stew. F A N BOYS: Breakin ’ it Down

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Слайд 7: FAN B OYS: Breakin ’ it Down

When a sentence has two things that are in conflict or that are opposites, use the conjunction but. but = however Ex. Rocky, my orange tomcat, loves having his head scratched but hates getting his claws trimmed. FAN B OYS: Breakin ’ it Down

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Слайд 8: FANB O YS: Breakin ’ it Down

When there is a choice between two or more options, use the conjunction or. or = alternatively Ex. The squid eyeball stew is so thick that you can eat it with a fork or spoon. FANB O YS: Breakin ’ it Down

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Слайд 9: FANBO Y S: Breakin ’ it Down

Yet functions as a coordinating conjunction meaning something like "nevertheless" or "but.” yet = however Ex. Rocky terrorizes the poodles next door yet adores the German shepherd across the street. FANBO Y S: Breakin ’ it Down

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Слайд 10: FANBOY S : Breakin ’ it Down

When on thing is a result of another, use the conjunction so. Ex. Even though I added cream to the squid eyeball stew, Rocky ignored his serving, so I got a spoon and ate it myself. FANBOY S : Breakin ’ it Down

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Слайд 11: Commas enclosing words, phrases, and clauses since the beginning of time

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Слайд 12

A panda walks into a bar. He orders a sandwich, eats it, then draws a gun and fires two shots in the air. "Why? Why are you behaving in this strange, un-panda-like fashion?" asks the confused waiter, as the panda walks towards the exit. The panda produces a badly punctuated wildlife manual and tosses it over his shoulder. "I'm a panda," he says, at the door. "Look it up." The waiter turns to the relevant entry and, sure enough, finds an explanation. "Panda. Large black-and-white bear-like mammal native to China. Eats, shoots and leaves.”

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Слайд 13: Comma Crash Course

8 Comma Usage Rules Comma Crash Course

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Слайд 14: Rule 1: Commas separate parts of a series, words, phrases, and clauses

Do not use a comma if all items are joined by and or or. Example Romeo, Juliet, and Friar Laurence were present at the ceremony. Falling in love, getting married, and ending the feud all occurred in less than a week. Romeo and Juliet had as advisors the nurse and Friar Laurence and Benvolio. Rule 1: Commas separate parts of a series, words, phrases, and clauses

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Слайд 15: Rule 2: Commas separate two or more adjectives preceding a noun

Example Young, beautiful Juliet married daring, dashing Romeo. The dark, stormy night was frightening. Rule 2: Commas separate two or more adjectives preceding a noun.

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Слайд 16: Rule 3: Use a comma before for, and, nor, but, or, yet and so to separate independent clauses in compound sentences

Example Rocky refuses to eat dry cat food, nor will he touch a saucer of squid eyeball stew. We looked through the school, and we searched outside the building. Rule 3: Use a comma before for, and, nor, but, or, yet and so to separate independent clauses in compound sentences.

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Слайд 17: Rule 4: Commas separate participial phrases and adjective clauses that are nonessential. Commas do not set off phrases or clauses that are essential to the meaning of the sentence

Example Juliet, who is a Capulet, married her Montague enemy. Awakened by the lark, Juliet wished it to be a nightingale. Rule 4: Commas separate participial phrases and adjective clauses that are nonessential. Commas do not set off phrases or clauses that are essential to the meaning of the sentence.

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Слайд 18: Rule 5: Commas follow participial phrases, adverb clauses, words such as well, yes, no, and names of direct address that begin sentences

Example When Romeo and Juliet first met, they spoke in sonnet form. Having learned that Romeo killed Tybalt, the Prince Excalus banished the young Montague. Yes, the story is a tragedy. Rule 5: Commas follow participial phrases, adverb clauses, words such as well, yes, no, and names of direct address that begin sentences.

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Слайд 19: Rule 6: Use commas to enclose interrupters such as, most appositives and appositive phrases, titles and degrees after a name, words in direct address

Do not use commas if the appositive is used for emphasis or identifies the person or thing by telling which one of two or more. Example Verona, the setting for the play, is in Italy. Go, Juliet, to Friar Laurence's cell. Mark Ferguson, Ph.D., is pursuing a new career in the literary field. Rule 6: Use commas to enclose interrupters such as, most appositives and appositive phrases, titles and degrees after a name, words in direct address

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Слайд 20: Rule 7: Commas separate a quotation from its source, such as "he said" or "she said."

Example When he first saw West Side Story, Juan said, "This story is similar to Romeo and Juliet.” Rule 7: Commas separate a quotation from its source, such as "he said" or "she said."

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Слайд 21: Rule 8: Commas are used in certain conventional situations such as, items in dates or addresses and after the salutation of a friendly letter and closing of any letter

Example May 23, 1990, is her birthday. Nashville, Tennessee, is his hometown. Dear Romeo, June 15, 1994 Rule 8: Commas are used in certain conventional situations such as, items in dates or addresses and after the salutation of a friendly letter and closing of any letter.

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Слайд 22: Comma/Conjunction Group Write

On the top of a blank sheet of paper, write of the following story starters: It was a strange night, there seemed to be a chill in the air... As soon as I arrived, I could sense that something was out of place... Sometimes I think my friend has strange powers. Every time he's around… All of the sudden I was trapped! Comma/Conjunction Group Write

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Последний слайд презентации: Commas and Conjunctions: Group write guidelines

Write your name on the left of the top line of your paper. Begin your story. Write 6 sentences. 3 of which must include one of the 8 comma rules. Exchange papers with someone else. Write your name in the left margin and add 6 new sentences to continue the story. 3 of which must include one of the 8 comma rules. Exchange. Everyone must contribute to 3 stories, eventually, using all 8 rules. Group write guidelines

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